I dare say Mrs Hudson will be a little put out when she sees this.

reblogged 10 minutes ago @ 24 Jul 2014 with 134 notes via/source

smithsonianlibraries:

In anticipation of Owl Awareness Day (August 4), we offer some slightly cartoony illustrations of these fascinating members of the genus Strix.

Images taken from Captain Thomas Brown’s “Illustrations of the American ornithology of Alexander Wilson and Charles Lucian Bonaparte" (1835).

reblogged 35 minutes ago @ 24 Jul 2014 with 160 notes via/source

bencumber:

For anyone visiting London: the essential pilgrimage stops 

reblogged 17 hours ago @ 23 Jul 2014 with 5,397 notes via/source
cumberbum:

[x]
reblogged 18 hours ago @ 23 Jul 2014 with 1,664 notes via/source
reblogged 1 day ago @ 23 Jul 2014 with 95 notes via/source
o-my-boys:

#OH MY GOD#THEY SKIPPED SCHOOL#TO AUDITION FOR THE FILM#NO FUCKING WONDER THEY GOT THE PART#THAT IS LITERALLY SOMETHING#FRED AND GEORGE WOULD HIGH FIVE OVER
reblogged 1 day ago @ 22 Jul 2014 with 126,684 notes via/source
superwholockianism:

fixed it.
reblogged 1 day ago @ 22 Jul 2014 with 3,532 notes via/source

thenorwoodbuilder:

Meanwhile, in the Canon…

(Arthur Conan Doyle, The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge)

reblogged 1 day ago @ 22 Jul 2014 with 2,469 notes via/source
victoriousvocabulary:

BON TON
[noun]
1. sophisticated manners or breeding; good form and elegant style.
2. fashionable society.
3. something regarded as fashionably correct; the proper thing to do.
Etymology: French, literally “good tone”.
[Lié Louis Périn-Salbreux - Portrait of Madame Sophie]

victoriousvocabulary:

BON TON

[noun]

1. sophisticated manners or breeding; good form and elegant style.

2. fashionable society.

3. something regarded as fashionably correct; the proper thing to do.

Etymology: French, literally “good tone”.

[Lié Louis Périn-Salbreux - Portrait of Madame Sophie]

reblogged 2 days ago @ 21 Jul 2014 with 241 notes via/source
smithsonianlibraries:

Oh, hello there!
Friendly skeleton from Natural History for the use of schools and families (1864)

smithsonianlibraries:

Oh, hello there!

Friendly skeleton from Natural History for the use of schools and families (1864)

reblogged 2 days ago @ 21 Jul 2014 with 1,071 notes via/source